REVIEW: Good Omens – Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Armageddon only happens once you know. They don’t let you go around again until you get it right.

The apocalypse is coming. The end of the world is nigh. Or, at least, it will be if demon, Crowley, and archangel, Aziraphale, can get their act together. Together the two have been tasked with the job of ensuring that the spawn of Lucifer grows up to bring about Armageddon, but what happens when they accidentally lose track of him?

Good Omens, is a witty, clever and, ultimately, very British take on the coming Apocalypse, as told by two of Britain’s greatest sci-fi authors of the modern era, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.

I honestly don’t know how I had never heard of this book before, but I am so glad it jumped out at me, from the library shelf, because once I started I simply couldn’t put it down.

Whether or not you’re from a Christian background, we all know the theory behind the apocalypse: Good vs. Evil, Heaven vs. Hell, thrashing it out while humanity watches on and ultimately is laid to waste as a result. But this book really turns that on it’s head and asks the question: what if humanity doesn’t just stand idly by, what if humanity dares to get involved, what then?

And the result is a clever, unique and hilarious book. I have to admit, I have read nowhere near as much of Pratchett and Gaiman’s other works as I should have, but I have read enough to tell you this reflects both of their styles brilliantly; it will keep you guessing, have you laughing out loud, and will take you on one hell of an adventure.

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